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I am 28-years-old and still get bullied | The Boston Blind Runner

Running For Change

I am 28-years-old and still get bullied

It has been quite a while since my last post. Just the other night, I was feeling that it was time to update folks andget back to the next steps for the Boston Blind Runner. As I was walking home from work today, I had a brief interaction and experience which quickly pushed aside my general updates for the next topic of my blog.
As I was standing at a very popular intersection of Boylston street, right near the Prudential Center and was waiting to cross the street, a car suddenly stopped at the painted cross walk and the driver then chose to verbaly attack me. “What? Are you f***ing blind? Why don’t you open your f***ing eyes?”. As soon as he was done saying what he had to say, he pulled through the intersection and headed off down the street. I was very taken back and filled with anger. My jaw became very tight, I was balling my fists and was feeling drawn towards the car. I was on the edge of reacting with a verbal attack, slamming my cane against his car or asking the man to step out of the car to say such a thing to me. However, I kept my cool and knew that reacting with the same hostility he had placed on me would not achieve anything. Sadly, after he drove away none of the people standing next to me validated the situation in any way, shape or form. No one asked if I was alright nor did anyone confirm that this guy was a true jerk-face.
As I continued on my walk to the train, I reminded myself of all of the wonderful people I have in my life, how many good out number the bad and that something horrific has told this man that this behavior is acceptable and necessary for him to display. I do not excuse him, but I feel sad that he feels as though he must take something away from another person to perhaps gain back what has been taken away from him. I have had many experiences with ignorant and hurtful comments, questions and statements. On the other hand, hostil and aggressive acts are less often but are always extremely startling. I do not dismiss what has happened to me, but am strongly reflecting on the hostil acts my friends from other minority groups encounter on a much more frequent and even deadly level. Today reminded me of how to react in some situations and that we all still have so much work to do. As always…
I am 28-years-old and still get bullied. It is true. I was also bullied when I was a kid; before and after my diagnosis of having a disability and choroideremia. I can recall a time in 8th grade when another kid down the street from where I grew up once told me on the bus that I was gay and was going to die a virgin. I was also taken back many times in situations like that one. I was so baffled by that random act of aggression. The aggressor on the bus was of a very small stature back then and probably still is now. I believe he had little man syndrome. As time went on, I also learned his father was not so gentle with his family.
I will not punch everyone, but I will question everyone. The fact that this sad man chose to act like this with no room for questioning leaves me hanging. I will certainly question the next person and I will not meet their aggression and hostility with my own. I always have, and always meet it with drive, determination and humanity.
“It gets better”. Well, does it really? I think it does, but let’s not teach our youth that it stops. Your friends, family, loved ones and resources can get better, and so can your own abilities. For right now, it does not go away. Let’s keep working at it, though.

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